6 WEEK CHALLENGE

Get summer ready in just 6 weeks. Follow weekly class plans and healthy recipes from our partners BBC Good Food. Whatever your level, get ready to turn up the heat!

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FIIT HEALTH DISCLAIMER

"The Fiit.tv platform is designed to help you reach your health and fitness goals with access to a range of 'professional trainers and fitness programs. Information provided through the Fiit.tv platform does not purport to be and must not be taken as medical advice, therefore, before starting any exercise regime you should consider consulting your doctor, especially if you have any medical condition(s) or are taking medication, are pregnant or have any related concerns. If you have asthma, diabetes, a heart condition, growth condition or have experienced chest pains or dizziness in the last month, we strongly advise you NOT to participate in any of the live or video•on•demand classes, activities and any other products and/or services which are provided by third party trainers via the Filt.tv platform (the "Session(s)").

By using the Fiit.tv platform, you recognise that there is always an element of risk involved with any physical activity and your attendance at or participation in any Session is solely at your own risk. If at any time during a Session you feel discomfort or pain you should cease the exercise and seek medical assistance as required. Your participation in these Sessions are entirely voluntary and you may opt out at any given time, if you so wish.

You agree that Fiit.tv will not be liable to you and/or any third party for or in connection with:
a) losses not caused by our breach of these terms and conditions; or
b) any consequential or incidental losses which are a side effect of the main loss or damage and not reasonably foreseeable by us and you at the time of entering into these terms and conditions.

Fiit.tv and its affiliates do not exclude or limit in any way its liability for:
a) death or personal injury caused by our negligence or the negligence of our employees, agents or subcontractors;
b) fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation; and
c) breach of the terms implied by applicable consumer protection legislation in England and Wales (to the extent they cannot be excluded by law).

Fiit.tv cannot accept any liability for the actions of third party trainers or any breach by them of the terms of their service to you. Fiit.tv will not be liable for any injury, loss, claim, damage or any special, exemplary, punitive, indirect or consequential damages of any kind, which arises out of or is in any way connected with your attendance at or participation in any Session."

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REAL STRENGTH NUTRITION: WEEK 2

REAL STRENGTH NUTRITION: WEEK 2

Jenna

19th October 2018

Welcome to week 2 of Real Strength!

If you’re into strength training, you’ve no doubt heard about macros (short for macronutrients) and meal timings in relation to building muscle. If you’re confused about this area then stick here and we’ll talk you through. Let’s start with the basics…

Carbs

Carbs are the body’s number one fuel and are stored in the body as glycogen. If you don’t have enough glycogen stored for when the body needs it, the body can start to break down muscle to use as energy. This is why carbs are essential in strength training.

There are different types of carbs: sugars, starches and fibre. Both sugars and starches are used as described above, but fibre is not. There are two forms of fibre: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fibre helps to create healthy gut bacteria and insoluble fibre plays a really important role in digestion. 

We want to be focusing on the fibre and starches (more complex carbohydrates) rather than the sugars. The fibre and starches will provide more sustained energy, they’re richer in micronutrients and will help to support your gut.

Fats

You probably know that there are different types of fats: unsaturated and saturated fats being just two of them.

Unsaturated fats are needed to absorb and store vitamins A, D, E and K. They’re also really important for a healthy gut, heart, hormone function and skin, and energy levels too. Fish, nuts, seeds, eggs and unrefined oils are good sources. 

So what’s the deal with the saturated fats? We used to think that saturated fat raised cholesterol which caused heart disease. But it’s not quite that simple. There are two main types of cholesterol (or two we really need to know about): HDL (aka good cholesterol) and LDL (aka bad cholesterol). HDL lowers LDL. Still with us? So saturated fats raise cholesterol but because they raise both the good and the bad this isn’t to say they’re all bad. We know that high levels of LDL aren’t great for our risk of heart disease but high levels of HDL can be protective.

So where does this leave us? Basically neither unsaturated or saturated fats should be feared.

Saturated fats are important for providing us with energy, our immune health and help absorb fat soluble nutrients (vitamins A, D, E and K). We advise consuming in moderation. An average person should consume between 60-70g of fat per day (with no more than 20-30g coming from saturated fats). Whole food sources are best e.g. eggs, avocados, coconut, fish and poultry, good quality oils, nut and seed butters, high quality dairy and small amounts of high quality red meat.

Real Strength Week 2 - Macros and meal timings

Proteins

Proteins are super important. We need them for our immune system, cell health and repair, and for most reactions in the body. Without them our skin, hair, nails, muscles, tissues and organs wouldn’t function properly. There are 20 types of amino acids (these are the building blocks of protein). 9 of these are essential, and we need to get them from our diet. An easy way to do this is mix up your protein sources. Think animal sources (meat, fish, eggs and dairy) and plant sources (nuts, seeds, beans, peas, legumes and soy products).

It can be confusing knowing exactly how much protein you need but if you’re on the Real Strength plan, try aiming for 1.2-1.5g protein per kg body weight.  So a 70kg person would need around 84-105g a day.

When to eat

You should always eat at least an hour before working out to allow enough time for digestion. Think about fuelling up on complex carbs and protein before a workout — try peanut butter or smashed banana on rye toast, or porridge with almond butter. 

After your sweat sesh you can pack in the proteins. We recommend a salmon and soya bean salad or a feta and tomato omelette.

Don’t get hung up on myths such as ‘no carbs after 6pm’. When it comes to meal timings try spacing them out evenly throughout the day and allow yourself some time to digest in the evening before you hit the hay. If you’re home late, go for something lighter like the salmon and soya bean salad or the feta and tomato omelette as these can be digested more easily than a heavier meal.

Let us know how you get on in the Facebook group and feel free to share your own recipes there too!

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